Rule #1 to Become a Millionaire: Act Poor

Becoming a millionaire from scratch looks like a huge challenge to most people. Reality is, if you are making an average of $25,000 annual income, you are a life-time millionaire if you keep making that much until you retire. But what happens to this money is that it’s always spent completely, especially with almost everybody just struggling to make ends meet. The increasing prices with no matching increases in salaries it’s not likely to make any progress towards touching that million dollars at one point.

That’s why it is important to understand one fact that’s considered the rule number one to become a millionaire: live cheap, act poor, save.

What happens is that most people in North America eat their lunch in restaurants, change their cars more frequently, go out for dinners to expensive places, buy stuff they don’t really need, spend insanely on gambling, alcohol, smoke, and lottery tickets (which are by the way the most lucrative industries in North America), and end up with huge debts that they can’t pay.

Making your lunch sandwich can save you up to $1300 per year. Going an extra year or two with your car are going to save you at least $1800 per year. Giving up smoking, alcohol, gambling, and lottery tickets can give your finances a huge boost.

What to do with this saved money? Simple, invest it. You don’t need to be a stock market savvy to make an investment. Go to your local bank and ask for a financial adviser to discuss how to invest the money you saved in your 401K or RRSP. If you can save $500 of your monthly salary that might mean a whopping $1000 investment in your retirement, given that your employer usually matches your investment, and both your contribution and your employers are cut from your salary before taxes, which means you might end up giving up $400/month only.

The main cause of the current recession is that people in North America tend to spend even more than they have, and end up sinking in unmanageable debts. When you start thinking about saving more than about the stuff that you want now, even if you don’t need them, you’re on your way to become a millionaire. If you only do the above investment and keep doing it every single month from now on for the next 30 years you can end up with $3-4 millions for your retirement.

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Financial Tips for Surviving Spouses

Financial Tips for Surviving Spouses

Author: Lisa Nichols

Financial tips for surviving spouses are a necessary part of creating an independent life as a widow. According to research conducted by the Social Security Administration in 2005, the poverty rate for elderly widows has been more than three times higher than that of married women in the same age range for more than 30 years. The research attributes at least some of the widow poverty rate to women who spend their savings on health care for a sick or dying husband. (McGarry, Kathleen and Schoeni, Robert F. (2005, January). Medicare Gaps and Widow Poverty. Perspectives, 66, 58-59.) Learning more about Medicare gaps, spousal benefits and how to establish a solid credit history are important financial tips that can help lead widows down the path to financial independence.

Medicare Gaps Can Make For Tough Times

Widows have to contend with a number of gaps in the Medicare program today. Medicare doesn’t cover chiropractor care, acupuncture treatments, dental care, custodial home care or custodial care in a nursing facility. Additional Medicare gaps include a lack of coverage for preventive care, which isn’t covered by the program. Retirement benefits can help pay for medical expenses, as long as you know where to go to kick-start the benefits process.

Retirement Benefits For Surviving Spouses

There is a great disparity of retirement benefits between the sexes. Eighty percent of men receive retirement benefits, but less than 40 percent of women receive benefits as retired workers. Also, more than 60 percent of women receive retirement benefits only through their spouse. Review all life and health insurance benefits and retirement plan information to make sure that you know where you stand and what type of insurance you have after your spouse has passed away. If your spouse was still employed at the time of death, contact his employer to find out about insurance benefits and wages owed for time worked and paid time off. In the meantime, begin shoring up your individual credit history.

Cleaning Up Your Credit Report

If, like many widows, you have never had a line of credit in your own name or have only been listed on joint credit card accounts, it’s time to make a name for yourself. You can start by applying for your own rewards credit card or low interest credit card . Rewards credit cards provide cash back, frequent flier miles or gift certificates just for using the card for regular purchases. A low interest credit card lets you build your credit history and doesn’t charge you high interest rates for using the card. Applying for either card is an excellent first step in establishing your credit history and more importantly, building your financial independence.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/credit-articles/financial-tips-for-surviving-spouses-440735.html

About the Author

Lisa Nichols is a freelance writer, website content strategist and marketing and PR strategy consultant. Originally from Eugene, Oregon, Lisa is currently based in Covington, Kentucky (also known as greater Cincinnati, Ohio).